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Wildflower Festival North Highlands (UK)

Wildflower Festival North Highlands (UK)

The North Highlands of Scotland cover a wide range of important areas for wild plants areas, for example The Flow Country – some of the largest blanket bog wetlands in the world, the rich and wild coastal heaths and grassland and a range of rich woodlands at the extreme north of their range. The natural plant diversity is matched by the diversity of geology, wildlife and a wider cultural diversity – from the Picts, Vikings, and Gaels to the modern communities of the North.

A series of community driven cultural events are being planned including a series of musical, cultural, archaeological and historical events.

Visit the UK Wildflower Festival page

Iain Sarjeant SP BIOD collection 067

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Wildflower Festival Rhodopes (Bulgaria)

Visit the Garden of Orpheus in the Rhodope Mountains of Southern Bulgaria. The area is a wildflower haven with over 2000 known species and has a rich heritage of music, crafts and agricultural traditions.

Lilium rhodopeaum and Haberlea rhodopensis, the Orpheus flowers, are species found only in these mountains and are written of in the chronicles of the ancient Thracians and the life of Orpheus. The legendary musician Orpheus was part of the Thracian heritage of this region.’

Visit the Bulgaria Wildflower Festival page

bulgaria

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Wildflower Festival Hvar (Croatia)

Visit the ancient Greek agricultural plain of Hvar and the medieval town centre of Stari Grad. The island has a rich natural environment from the sea to the plain and the forests, and a diversity of cultural and historical traditions.

The island is also famous for its lavender festival and for its stone walled agricultural landscape set up by Greek colonists in the 4th century BC which is still in use today.

Visit the Croatia Wildflower Festival page

Forests and beaches of Hvar | Municipality of Stari Grad

Forests and beaches of Hvar | Municipality of Stari Grad

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Wildflower Festival Bohinj (Slovenia)

The farming communities around Lake Bohinj in the Julian Alps developed the first wildflower festival in 2005 and it has grow to include a wide range of botanical tours, cultural and musical events, and markets.

The Bohinj area is famous for its meadows and alpine flowers and also for the legend of Zlatarog. This mystical gold horned chamois was revived by the magical power of the Triglav flower (Potentilla nitidus).

Visit the Slovenia Wildflower Festival page

Bohinj Church | Seona Anderson

Bohinj Church | Seona Anderson

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Wildflower Festival Târnava Mare (Romania)

The Saxon villages of lowland Central Transylvania are one of the best preserved medieval landscapes of Europe. They are set in a mosaic of meadows, grazing land, forests, gullies and small scale farming.

The Tarnava Mare region is at the centre of attempts to conserve and develop a vibrant rural economy while preserving the rich natural heritage of the area.

Visit the Romania Wildflower Festival page

Saxon village in Târnava Mare | Fundatia ADEPT

Saxon village in Târnava Mare | Fundatia ADEPT

Map of wildflower festivals

Wildflower festivals

From May 2013 you will be able to visit wildflower festivals at five sites across Europe to experience the beauty of the plant rich landscapes and a diversity of local cultural events.

Visit the alpine meadows around Lake Bohinj, the ancient agricultural systems of Hvar, the Garden of Orpheus in the Rhodope Mountains, the Saxon villages of Transylvania and the striking coasts and landscapes of Northern Scotland. Take a tour with local guides, taste the local food, visit the markets for local products, and enjoy a range of artistic, musical and cultural events.

The festivals are aimed at local, national and international visitors and have a range of activities for families, plant or culture enthusiasts, and those who simply want to enjoy beautiful and interesting surroundings. Many of the activities are free or have a small charge. Please clink on the links to find out more about each of the festival sites.

Each of the festivals will take place in areas of exceptional botanical and cultural interest. They are all recognised as ‘Important Plant Areas’ under the Convention on Biological Diversity, and are Natura 2000 sites or National Parks. The aims of the wildflower festivals are to raise awareness of how special these areas are, and to bring economic benefits to local individuals and businesses (local food & craft products, tourism services, etc) that may help to preserve these landscapes for the future.

UK (North Highlands)
Bulgaria
Croatia
Romania
Slovenia